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Table 7 Logistic regression of moving from unemployment to inactivity for the workers receiving or not receiving old-age benefits in t 0

From: The impact of easy and early access to old-age benefits on exits from the labour market: a macro-micro analysis

Workers receiving or not receiving old-age benefits in t 0
  Odds ratio Standard error Odds ratio Standard error
Age (years)
 50–54 1   1  
 55–59 2.135a 0.213 2.102a 0.208
 60–64 6.593a 1.469 4.602a 0.840
 >65    2.974a 1.014
Sex
 Males 1   1  
 Females 1.607a 0.151 1.519a 0.137
Δunemployment rate b 0.716a 0.023 0.736a 0.023
Old-age benefits as a source of income in t 1
 No 1   1  
 Yes 2.285a 0.236 2.284a 0.231
Log likelihood −1471.27   −1539.94  
LR 276.51 (df = 5)   296.78 (df = 6)  
p value 0.00   0.00  
McFadden’s adj. R 2 0.082   0.088  
Sensitivity 60.47%c   62.27%d  
Specificity 66.51%c   65.86%d  
Correctly classified 64.76%c   64.79%d  
  1. The sample comprised individuals aged either 50–59 (females) and 50–64 (males) or workers aged 50+; annual data for the period 2004–2010. Sample size for the workers aged 50–59 (females) and 50–64 (females)—2676 observations; for the workers aged 50+—2769 observations
  2. asignificant at the 1% level
  3. bRefers to a 1 percentage point change in the negative change in the unemployment rate
  4. cCut-off level in the classification table 0.2892 (based on the share of the outflow in the whole sample)
  5. dCut-off level in the classification table 0.2987 (based on the share of the outflow in the whole sample)
  6. Source: authors’ calculations; data sources: LFS