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Table 8 Logistic regression of moving from unemployment to inactivity for workers not receiving any kind of old-age benefit in t 0

From: The impact of easy and early access to old-age benefits on exits from the labour market: a macro-micro analysis

Workers not receiving any kind of old-age benefit in t 0
  Odds ratio Standard error Odds ratio Standard error
Age (years)
 50–54 1   1  
 55–59 2.607a 0.343 2.106a 0.289
 60–64 9.713a 2.952 7.763a 2.387
Sex
 Males 1   1  
 Females 1.733a 0.216 1.816a 0.235
Δunemployment rate b 0.696a 0.029 0.750a 0.031
Old-age benefits as a source of income in t 1
 No 1    
 Yes 4.714a 1.023   
Main source of income in t 1
 Old-age benefitc    1  
 Unemployment benefit    0.121a 0.070
 Social welfared    0.048a 0.021
 Invalidity allowance    0.155a 0.072
Log likelihood −874.51   −841.02  
LR 230.57 (df = 5)   297.54 (df = 7)  
p value 0.00   0.00  
McFadden’s adj. R 2 0.110   0.142  
Sensitivity 62.53%e   64.56%e  
Specificity 68.61%e   70.44%e  
Correctly classified 67.07%e   68.95%e  
  1. The sample comprised individuals aged either 50–59 (females) and 50–64 (males) or workers aged 50+; annual data for the period 2004–2010. Sample size for both models—1749 observations
  2. asignificant at the 1% level
  3. bRefers to a 1 percentage point change in the negative change in the unemployment rate
  4. cOld-age benefits—pension or retirement benefits
  5. dSocial welfare—social benefit, non-income source, dependent
  6. eCut-off level in the classification table 0.2533 (based on the share of the outflow in the whole sample)
  7. Source: authors’ calculations; data sources: LFS